Foot Conditions

Bunions (Hallux valgus)

Hallux valgus, often referred to as "a bunion," is tilting over towards the smaller toes and a bony lump appears on the inside of the foot. Sometimes a soft swelling develops over the bony lump.

Bunions can occur, but much less commonly in culture that do not wear shoes. Narrow shoes that squeeze the big toe or high heels may worsen the deformity, particularly in people who are at higher risk. Read more...

Lesser Toes Deformity

The lesser toes are those other than your big toes; they can suffer from a range of deformities which can affect their position and make the toe more likely to be affected by other complications.

The big toe has only one interphalangeal joint, but the lesser toes have two. The most common types of deformities which affect the lesser toes are covered below. Read more...

Big toe arthritis (Hallux Rigidus)

'Hallux' refers to the big toe, while "rigidus" indicates that the toe is rigid and cannot move. Hallux rigidus is actually a form of degenerative arthritis.

This disorder can be very troubling and even disabling, since we use the big toe whenever we walk, stoop down, climb up, or even stand. Many patients confuse hallux rigidus with a bunion, which affects the same joint, but they are very different conditions requiring different treatment. Read more...

Morton's Neuroma

A neuroma is a benign tumour of a nerve. Morton's neuroma is not actually a tumour, but a thickening of the tissue that surrounds the digital nerve leading to the toes. Morton's neuroma occurs as the nerve passes under the ligament connecting the toe bones (metatarsals) in the forefoot.

Morton's neuroma most frequently develops between the third and fourth toes, usually in response to irritation, trauma or excessive pressure. The incidence of Morton's neuroma is 8 to 10 times greater in women than in men. Read more...

Heel Pain

Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. The plantar fascia is the flat band of tissue (ligament) that connects your heel bone to your toes. It supports the arch of your foot. If you strain your plantar fascia, it gets weak, swollen, and irritated (inflamed). Then your heel hurts when you stand or walk.

Plantar fasciitis is caused by straining the ligament that supports your arch. Repeated strain can cause tiny tears in the ligament. These can lead to pain and swelling. Read more...

Flat Foot

You have flatfeet when the arches on the inside of your feet are flattened, allowing the entire soles of your feet to touch the floor when you stand up.

A common and usually painless condition, flatfeet can occur when the arches don't develop during childhood. In other cases, flatfeet develop after an injury or from the simple wear-and-tear stresses of age. Read more...

Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

The posterior tibial tendon is one of the main supporting structures of the arch of the foot. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a condition caused by inflammation and weakness in the tendon, impairing its ability to support the arch. This results in flattening of the foot.

PTTD is often called "adult acquired flatfoot" because it is the most common type of flatfoot developed during adulthood. Although this condition typically occurs in only one foot, some people may develop it in both feet. PTTD is usually progressive, which means it will keep getting worse, especially if it isn't treated early. Read more...